Nothing in this post is intended to be taken as medical advice. We do not offer medical advice. If you or someone you know needs help, scroll to the bottom of this page for links to important depression and mental health resources, and contact a healthcare provider.

CHAPTER 11: THE OVERLOAD

 

CHAPTER 12: GLOBAL ECONOMICS AND ITS PERSONAL RELEVANCE

 

CHAPTER 13: POLICY; AND PARITY IN PRACTICE

 

CHAPTER 14: SOME SOLUTIONS FOR THE SYSTEM

 

PEOPLE

  • Caroline Leland – Freelance Journalist; Contributing Factors Host & Producer
  • Lucero Sifuentes – Individual living with Major Depressive Disorder
  • Lorenzo Lorenzo-Luaces – Assistant Professor, Indiana University Bloomington
  • Rachael Massell – Psychotherapist, Independent Practitioner
  • Janet Currie – Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Princeton University; Director, Princeton Center for Health and Wellbeing
  • Denise Razzouk – Author, Mental Health Economics; Head of the Discipline of Psychiatry, Universidade Metropolitana de Santos
  • Mary Carter – Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner, The Renfrew Center
  • Jameson Norton – CEO, Vanderbilt Psychiatric Hospital and Clinics; Executive Director, Vanderbilt Behavioral Health
  • Vin Mitta – Vice President of Clinical Operations, Oscar Health

 

LINKS

“Only half the patients with a threshold disorder are recognized and then only half of those are recognized or treated. Only half of those are treated are treated effectively.” -Jameson Norton, CEO, Vanderbilt Hospital and Clinics

 

Mental Health and Money

The annual economic cost of MDD in the United States alone is a staggering US$70 billion in medical expenditure, lost productivity and other costs.

Depression costs 1 trillion dollars a year globally via loss of productivity. By 2030, the cost of mental disorders will grow to $6 trillion from its current $2.5 trillion dollars.

 

Some insurers don’t reimburse mental health providers well — which makes it harder for those providers to be able to afford treating uninsured patients, or to provide sufficient services to their existing patients, or to take on new patients. As a result, many psychiatrists and other mental health professionals decide not to accept many kinds of insurance, so people with health insurance often struggle to find an in-network provider.

 

In 2015, insurance companies reimbursed mental health professionals 83 cents to every dollar that primary care doctors were reimbursed — and this held true even when those providers were treating the same condition, like depression.

 

Health insurance is more likely to cover post-diagnosis treatment than any kind of proactive mental health protections.

CHIP Is Beloved. Why Is Its Funding In Danger? (The New York Times, 2017)

 

Affordable Care Act

Supporters of the ACA emphasize the law’s role in protecting patients with pre-existing conditions, including mental health conditions. An October 2017 executive order from President Trump gave states new ways to get around those requirements.

 

In the 18 states that have not accepted the expansion, adults that fall into a certain income range (below the federal poverty line but with income above 44% of the poverty line) end up without coverage.

 

Mental Health Parity

 

What Is the Collaborative Care Model? (Psychiatry.org)

Minds Up – Stigma-fighting mental health site by Denise Razzouk

“When a Stress Expert Battles Mental Illness” – one man’s experience struggling to find a diagnosis

 

HOW TO GET HELP

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

What to do if you think you might be depressed (healthfinder.gov)

Common reasons people avoid treatment and expert advice on how to get past them (WebMD)

How Can I Get Help for Depression? (Healthline.com)

Finding Help (Anxiety and Depression Association of America)

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